Doreens’ call broke my heart. She is 73, disabled and alone. She just got an eviction notice. She never failed to pay rent nor was she ever late. The landlord simply has other plans and technically, they do NOT have to renew her lease. We are working on this case. Although she never really worked, we believe she is eligible for her late husband’s social security. Not to mention medicare or medicaid. She is now living on a small inheritance (less than $50K) butwhen that runs out, she may face serious financial problems. In short, this woman sounds desperate. This call typifies why I do what I do. It gives me gratitude that I am able to help people - not just with run-of-the-mill consumer stuff but with life-altering challenges.

Peggy used Rover.com to hire a dog sitter. When she returned home from her trip, she found her dog severely injured requiring surgery and intensive care. Her vet bills topped $15,000! Now she wants to be reimbursed according to Rover’s guarantee.  Believe it or not, Rover.com does guarantee the safety of your pet. Basically it says they will pay up to $25,000 if your pet is hurt or injured during the pet-sitter stay - subject to many terms and conditions. One of those conditions states, in essence, if any charges are incurred 30 days AFTER the date of injury, they will NOT be covered.  OUCH! In this case, shoe will only get $1,000. Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do about it.

Brett built a home on his property for his mom to live in. When she sells her home she wants to give Brett $150,000 as a gift. He wants to know if he has to pay tax. Or does she have to pay tax? The quick answer is NO ONE HAS TO PAY TAX ON GIFTS, except in very rare circumstances AND THERE IS NO YEARLY LIMIT ON WHAT YOU CAN GIVE (OR GET).  THERE IS A "LIMIT" BUT THAT LIMIT IS JUST FOR REPORTING PURPOSES - NOT TO COLLECT TAX. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST MISUNDERSTOOD AREAS ON LAW. So, instead of repeating myself, see this VIDEO for details. NOTICE: The video references a yearly limit of $14,000 and a lifetime limit of $5.5M. Since then, things have changed. The yearly limit is now $15,000 and the lifetime limit is $11M.

Heather’s pay check was lost. Now she needs a new one issued. For some reason the employer (Dillard's) has not replaced the check after multiple requests. In general, Colorado’s Wage and Hour division says, in essence, that a worker must write a demand letter, give the employer a reasonable time, before taking them to court. In this case, she can take them to small claims court and even ask for “treble damages” (which is triple the amount).  I KNOW THEY PAID HER AND SHE LOST IT! But once they get notice that the check was never cashed, they remain “enriched”. They technically did not pay her. We are working on this!